Tuesday Tips: Tempering Chocolate

Tempering is the process of melting and cooling chocolate so it will be smooth and glossy and perfect for making chocolate-dipped confections. Chocolate that isn’t tempered will look awful and will not properly set-up. For best results, use high-quality dark bar chocolate.

Chocolate Tempering tips

Tips for tempering chocolate
Using a digital thermometer to temper chocolate

On the stove

  • Finely chop 1 pound dark, milk or white chocolate.
  • Combine three-quarters of the chocolate and 2 teaspoons shortening in a heatproof bowl set over a pan of simmering water. (Don’t let the water touch the bowl.)
  • Melt the chocolate and bring it to 100 degrees F, stirring, then place the bowl in a larger bowl of cold water; stir in the remaining chocolate until melted (the temperature should drop to about 82 degrees F). Use a digital, instant-read thermometer to check temperature.
  • Place the bowl back over the simmering water. Bring dark chocolate to 90 degrees F and milk or white chocolate to 88 degrees F. Rewarm to 90 or 88 degrees F if the chocolate cools and becomes too thick for dipping or pouring.

In the microwave

  • Finely chop 1 pound dark, milk or white chocolate.
  • Combine three-quarters of the chocolate and 2 teaspoons shortening in a microwave-safe bowl.
  • Microwave 30 seconds, then stir.
  • Continue microwaving in 30-second intervals, stirring, until the chocolate is melted and the temperature is 100 degrees F.
  • Remove the bowl and place it in a larger bowl of cold water; stir in the remaining chocolate until melted (the temperature should drop to about 82 degrees F).
  • Remove the bowl from the water and microwave in 10-second intervals until dark chocolate is 90 degrees F and milk or white chocolate is 88 degrees F. Rewarm to 90 or 88 degrees F if the chocolate cools and becomes too thick for dipping or pouring.

A few notes about chocolate types

Dark chocolate
More stable and easier to temper than milk or white chocolate, tempered dark chocolate, such as semisweet or bittersweet, makes a nice snap when you break it.

Milk chocolate
Like white chocolate, this melts at a lower temperature than dark chocolate, so watch it closely. Because of the added milk solids and low percentage of cocoa butter in milk chocolate, the candy will be slightly softer with less snap than candy made with dark chocolate.

White chocolate
Be careful when tempering white chocolate, especially in the microwave: It has a very low melting temperature and can scorch easily. Unlike milk and dark chocolate, it does not contain cocoa solids; it’s a mix of cocoa butter, milk solids and sugar.
 

More tips for tempering

Watch out for moisture.
It is imperative to keep both chocolate and tools dry. If water or steam gets into the bowl while you’re melting, the chocolate will seize up into a stiff, grainy paste.

Chop chop.
Finely chopping the chocolate will help it melt quickly and evenly. If chopping a big, thick block, use a large serrated knife.

Avoid chocolate chips and candy-making products called “melts”
The melts let you skip the tempering, but they are not real chocolate and they’re usually made with partially hydrogenated oil in place of cocoa butter. Chocolate chips are made with less cocoa butter than bar chocolate, so they don’t melt as easily.

Test your temper.
Spread a small amount of melted chocolate on a plate; the chocolate should harden in a few minutes and remain shiny. If it doesn’t, repeat the tempering process.

Reuse your chocolate.
Let your leftover tempered chocolate harden, then cover and store it at room temperature. You can re-temper it up to two more times.

SOURCE PROPS: Food Network

                                                                                                                                                     

Hello Friends and Fans!

Whether I’m writing a new story or making confections, I’m always looking to improve on the old recipes and add new ones to my “cookbook”. And whether confections or stories, I like a variety of styles, tastes and textures. How about you?

If you enjoy making candies and other confections, be sure to follow my blog posts (or follow me on Pinterest or The Candy Store on Facebook) for  Thursday Treats and Tuesday Tricks. Team Poague will be sharing our favorite candy, cookie and cake recipes and a few confection-making tricks we’ve learned along the way. We hope you will share your favorites with us as well!

Michele

                                                                                                                                                     

Looking for a delicious read? Try The Candy Store, a time travel tale.
“An engaging, bittersweet saga about finding a place to belong”. KIRKUS REVIEWS

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